WILSON’S LOCAL PRINT AND DIGITAL COMMUNITY INSTITUTION SINCE 1896

Wilson County gazetteer: More local landmarks

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HORN’S MILL

In 1778, Henry Horn’s mill was on Contentnea Creek, presumably at the same site as Baker’s Hill about a half-mile S.W. of Horn’s Bridge. Horn’s Grist and Saw Mills on the north side of Contentnea Creek were bought by Thomas Horn in 1811.

HORN’S MILL

In 1804, John Horn established a mill on Little Swamp (probably the one N.E. of Wilson).

HORN’S STORE

In 1819 a locality in the vicinity of the present Wilson.

HORSELOT SLASH

Scene of a traditional minor skirmish with some of Cornwallis’s troops in 1781. Begins about 3/4 mile N. or Black Creek and curls across the Old Wilson-Goldsboro Road three times before entering said creek.

HORSEPEN BRANCH

In 1812 described as N. of Great Swamp and Mill Swamp.

HUCKLEBERRY BRANCH

Begins 3/4 mile E. of Boyette and flows N. across the railroad into Black Creek.

INDIAN FORD

Here was “the falls” of Contentnea Creek, below which the stream has always been navigable by boats. It is a shallow rock formation a half-mile E.S.E. of U.S. 301.

IVORY SWAMP

Begins in Wayne County and runs northeasterly into Contentnea Creek about 3/4 mile S.W. of Stantonsburg Bridge.

JOYNER’S DEPOT

Established in 1839 a mile N. of the present on the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad. Elm City, The Old Stage Road crossed there. Joyner’s Depot Post Office 1846-73. Town of Joyner’s incorporated in 1870. Nothing exists there now, except the U.S. 301 overpass over the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad, and the antebellum William Dew Farmer house.

JUNIPER CREEK

Rises in Nash County and flows S.E. into Bloomery Swamp about 1 1/4 miles N.W. of Lamm’s School.

LAMM’S CROSSROADS

Named for Haywood Lamm. Community about 7 1/2 miles S.W. of Wilson, 1 1/4 miles S. of Contentnea Creek, and halfway between Moore’s Crossroads and Scott’s Church going E. toward Wiggin’s Mill.

LAMM’S CROSSROAD

Named for Wiley Lamm. About 1/2 mile W. of Farmer’s Crossroads in the direction of Stott’s Crossroads, crossing the Lamm’s School-Horn’s Bridge Road.

LAMM’S ROAD

In 1886 name for the road from Wiggin’s Mill to Haywood Lamm’s Crossroads.

LAMM’S SCHOOL

Crossroad and community on Route 264 a little S. of Bloomery Swamp and 5 1/2 miles W.N.W. of Wilson. Named for Thomas Ruffin Lamm. Post office maintained here 1895-1906. Population about 40.

LEE’S BRANCH

By 1770 named for Richard Lee. Probably the branch that flows N. from Wilbanks into Cattail Swamp.

LEE SWAMP

Rises N.W. of Hawra and flows S.E. in an arc into Black Creek a little over a mile S. of Lucama. Named for the Lee family who once resided there.

LITTLE CONTENTNEA CREEK

Begins S.W. of the eastern tip of Wilson County and flows southeasterly along the Pitt-Greene boundary into Contentnea Creek.

LITTLE CREEK

In 1902 described as near Barnes’s Store. Begins in Johnston County W. of said store and flows northeasterly into Contentnea Creek.

LITTLE SWAMP

In 1770 apparently the name for Cattail Swamp

LITTLE SWAMP

As early as 1819 described as beginning over a mile W. of New Hope and flowing S.E. into Toisnot Swamp almost 2 miles S. of Winstead’s Mill Reservoir.

LONG BRANCH

In 1902 a bridge was built over it, perhaps at the present U.S. 301 crossing about 3/4 mile E. of Lucama. It flows southeasterly into Black Creek.

LONG FISH BRANCH

Since about 1890 called Cabin Branch. Begins just W. of the ACL Railroad and flows E. into Contentnea Creek 3/4 miles S. of Rountree’s Bridge.

Hugh Johnston was a Wilson County historian who wrote these historical capsules that previously appeared in The Wilson Daily Times. They are reprinted from a volume of his “Looking Backward” series of books available at the Wilson County Public Library.

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