WILSON’S LOCAL PRINT AND DIGITAL COMMUNITY INSTITUTION SINCE 1896

Judges smile on young showmen

Ross Hinnant earns repeat honor for grand champion steer

Thank you for being one of our most loyal readers. Please consider supporting community journalism by subscribing to The Wilson Times.

Click the play button to view a video from the Wilson County 4-H Show and Sale.
Drew C.Wilson | Times
Posted

Ross Hinnant has raised the grand champion steer for the second year in a row at the 67th annual Wilson County 4-H Livestock Show and Sale.

The 11-year-old fifth-grader from Rock Ridge Elementary School, won the top award with a blonde steer named Mango, weighing in at 1,325 pounds.

Hinnant said he rises every morning at 4 a.m. to tend to his steer.

“Whenever I get home from school I give him a bath and that causes his hair to grow and I just feed him the right stuff,” Hinnant said.

Hinnant said he loves being able to bond with his animal. Hinnant said what is appealing about Mango is he is “freak-necked,” stout, structurally correct, sound and wide-based.

Winning reserve champion was Cole Williamson, of Lucama, with his 1,270-pound steer Red Man.

Best county calf and junior champion showman was Annah Claire Sullivan, of Lucama, with her 1,375-pound steer Clyde.

Senior champion showman was Trevor Williamson, of Lucama, with his 1,130-pound steer Bocephus.

Other steer competitors included James Gardner, Charlotte Edwards, Andrew Pate, Bryson Ingram, Emma Vick and Trace Davis.

For hogs, grand champion pen of three and junior showmanship champion was Logan Ballance, of Lucama, with average weight of 259 pounds.

Reserve champion pen of three was Ethan Thompson, of Lucama, with an average weight of 275.

Grand champion individual was Andrew Jones, of Rock Ridge.

Reserve champion individual and senior showmanship champion was Ben Scott, of Lucama.

Best county market hog winner was Sarah Scott, of Lucama.

Other competitors in the show and sale for pigs were Ashton Webb, Charlie Scott, Caleb Kiefer, T. Sharp, Madison Bass, Summer Patton, Finia Gamble, Elizabeth Weppler, D.J. Scott, Will Brantley, Harper Black, Savannah Comstock, Jacob Nichols, Caleb Heath, Madison Barnes, Faith Jones, Cody Miller, Lin Scott, Martha-Anne Bissette, Kenzie Brantley, Savannah Ward, Bennett Lamm, Holly Williams, Savannah Baraberio, Rio Montes, Will Clark, McLane Sharp, Logan Hinnant, Jamison Kyles, Walker Edwards, Wood Vick, Gracie Beamon, Luke Jones, Braxton Tutor, McKenzie Hinnant, Tanner Brewer, Reagan Lamm, Sara Grayson Sumner, Graison Nichols, Cassidy Kyles, Avery Bissette, Taylor Honeycutt, Amanda Durham, Bryson Keel, Savanna Renfrow, Robbie Sharp, Jack Beamon, Josie Harrell, Avery Nichols, Jordan Tyner, Dalton Comstock, Colby Smith, Blake Edwards, Mahayla Mosley, Jopn Hinnant, Auston Dew, Rachel Thomason, Alyson Sharp, Hunter Aliff, Reece Bartlett, Jackson Bass, Trevor Robbins, Landon Beamon, Emma Bass, Nathan Sholar, Javan Harrell, Brandon Tyner, Kaiya Patton, Shannon Baker, Mason Hinnant, Nathan Sholar, Madison Honeycutt, Thomas Edwards, Taner Rodgers, Allie Entrikin, Conner Barfield and Mackenzie Mosley.

“There is a lot of hard work and dedication that goes into these projects and it was definitely on display here in Wilson County,” said Jessica Anderson, livestock extension agent for the North Carolina Cooperative Extension office in Wilson County. “The showmen did fantastic. All of our volunteers and ring help were great and everybody just pitched in to make sure that everything ran smoothly and we had a great show.”

Several hundred members of the Wilson community turned out for the sale of the pigs and steers.

“The scholarship money will help go toward college educations and also helps them afford their project next year,” said Jessica Manning, 4-H and youth development agent for the North Carolina Cooperative Extension office in Wilson County. “It’s more than just about the scholarship money. It’s about the life skill development they learn and the leadership skills, the communication skills, the critical thinking skills in order to be able to calculate what they need to produce the best quality animal and I congratulate every one of them for all of the hard work and dedication as well as the parents and volunteers and all of those that have supplied some sort of knowledge for the project that they were doing. Everybody’s a winner.”

Comments