WILSON’S LOCAL PRINT AND DIGITAL COMMUNITY INSTITUTION SINCE 1896

Home tour drives people to historic district

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This Saturday the Old Wilson Neighbors Association will hold the annual Historic Holiday Homes Tour at historic residences around the city.

OWNA President Chip Futrell said different homes are included each year, and the event is meant to help celebrate the season.

Kathy Bethune with Preservation of Wilson said she is happy with the wave of interest in the history of the homes.

“It is a great opportunity for people to visit the historic district and get aquainted with the architecture,” said Bethune.

Seven homes have been decorated for the holidays and will be open for guests to visit.

•The Jacob Tomlinson house on Broad Street was built in 1915 and is a Classical Revival-style home.

•The Williams-Woodard-Banks house on Broad Street is a Queen Anne-style home attributed to architect George Barber. It was built at the end of the 19th century by Mattie Branch Gay and her husband, Jesse Williams.

•The George Adams house on Raleigh Road was built in 1925 and features a symmetrical body with an arched entrance, classic columns, paneled wooden bases and dentil molding. Notice the original 1925 Art Deco wallpaper in rooms throughout the house.

•The Oscar P. Dickenson house on Branch Street is a bungalow and was built in the 1920s for, then attorney, Oscar P. Dickenson.

•The Lamm-Berry House on Raleigh Road Parkway was built in 1951 on a two-acre property. The home has been renovated inside and out by Brenda and Gary Farmer, who bought it in 2002. The couple worked to maintain and respect the original features and elements of the old home throughout renovations.

•The Nadal-Weathersby-Chesson house on Nash Street is a Western Stick-style bungalow built in 1916. Granite is used on the porch pillars and the chimney. The home is currently being restored by Preservation of Wilson.

•The Wi and Eva High house on Branch Street is a frame bungalow and was built in 1911 for $4,100.

The tour is self-guided and guests have from 1-5 p.m. to visit all seven homes. Tickets are $15 and can be purchased from The Rummage Warehouse, Park Place Antiques, Wilson Chamber of Commerce, Brewmasters, Flowers’ Plantation and Tig’s Courtyard.

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