WILSON’S LOCAL PRINT AND DIGITAL COMMUNITY INSTITUTION SINCE 1896

Heroin dealer’s sentence ‘sends clear message’

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A man who authorities say was a major heroin dealer in Wilson will now spend more than a decade in prison.

Tyquan Savory, 28, pleaded guilty earlier this week in Wilson County Superior Court to two counts of trafficking opium. Superior Court Judge Walter H. Godwin Jr. sentenced Savory to roughly 11 1/2 to 15 1/2 years in prison. Savory also received a $100,000 fine.

INVESTIGATION

The Wilson County Sheriff’s Office and the Wilson Police Department conducted a narcotics investigation into Savory’s dealings from February 2017 until July 2017, according to officials.

The operation included a confidential informant who made around 25 controlled buys of cocaine and heroin, according to court records.

Based on those warrants that were obtained through those undercover investigations for the drug sales, officers stopped Savory on July 25, 2017, prosecutor Joel Stadiem told the court.

When authorities stopped Savory, police found a Newport cigarette box that was filled with pills later determined to be oxycodone, which is an opium derivative, Stadiem said. Officials seized 28 pills during that time.

Savory was operating the vehicle when he was stopped, officials said. The net weight of those pills came out to be more than 4 grams and the total just under 15 grams of opium, officials said.

BINDLES OF HEROIN

In April 2017, police and deputies seized 161 bindles of heroin as well as powder cocaine from Savory after a search warrant was executed at 1837 Butterfield Lane. Law enforcement had received complaints from the community about Savory’s activity, police said.

Savory pleaded guilty to trafficking charges Wednesday in exchange for the dismissal of pending drug sale charges, which carry lesser time than trafficking.

“Savory was identified to be the source of supply of heroin to over 15 individuals,” Sheriff Calvin Woodard said. “There were numerous controlled purchases of heroin made from Savory. Upon examination of the evidence by the N.C. Crime Lab, it was determined that the heroin contained a mixture of cocaine and fentanyl.”

SENDING A CLEAR MESSAGE

Wilson police Capt. Jeff Boykin said Savory was identified as one of “our main heroin dealers in Wilson.”

Boykin said the investigation is a part of the department’s continued focus on arresting those responsible for selling heroin and opioids in the community.

“This should send a clear message that we take these crimes seriously and we make that our focus to remove those individuals from our community by seeking justice,” Boykin said. He added that he’s thankful to the district attorney’s office for its role in making sure Savory was prosecuted.

“They worked with us to get that done,” Boykin said.

Police Chief Thomas Hopkins said targeting those who sell heroin and prescription painkillers is part of the department’s response to the opioid epidemic.

“We are dedicated to removing these dangerous drugs and drug offenders from our city streets,”Hopkins said. “These drugs have shown to cause overdoses and overdose deaths in our neighborhoods. Our officers and detectives strive diligently to develop good cases against the individuals who are distributing these dangerous narcotics. This is why it is important for the Wilson Police Department to be involved with our youth. We develop relationships with kids to help open the lines of communication about the dangers of illicit drugs. We would like to thank the district attorney’s office for their diligence in the prosecution of these case. Our continued close relationship with the courts and court system benefits everyone in the city of Wilson as we move forward.”

Woodard said drug dealers should know that drugs are “not welcome in Wilson County.”

“The joint effort to diminish Wilson County of this poison is a tedious task, but one that law enforcement agencies of Wilson County are committed to each and every day,” Woodard said. “Our families and children do not deserve to endure this illegal activity or learn this way of quick/easy money.”

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