WILSON’S LOCAL PRINT AND DIGITAL COMMUNITY INSTITUTION SINCE 1896

‘A beacon of recovery’

RC3 celebrates 2 years helping area

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Two years ago, a dream became a reality when the first recovery center opened its doors in Wilson. Since then, countless people have found hope at Recovery Concepts Community Center, known as RC3. Lives have been changed due to various programs offered to those who are working to sustain and maintain their recovery from substance use disorders.

“RC3 has become a beacon of recovery not only within Wilson County, but in eastern North Carolina as well,” said Jeff Hill, Wilson County Substance Prevention Coalition’s executive director. “We are proud to have RC3 as a mainstay and pillar of our coalition, and I can’t wait to see how far we can go from here.”

Leaders have worked at the ground level to ensure resources are available for families, friends and those seeking to build a life in recovery. Its staff and volunteers offer a host programs including social events, group meetings, educational opportunities and health status testing.

RC3 has had more than 2,000 participants during its 2018-19 fiscal year, as well as nearly 1,000 walk-ins, 290 support groups and nearly 250 trainings and events.

The center is on track to exceed those numbers for fiscal year 2019-20

Gina Lane, RC3’s coordinator, said the center’s activities have increased tremendously since its doors opened two years ago.

“The support groups that meet at RC3 have increased as well,” Lane said. The most recent addition to support groups at the center includes Alateen, which is for young people ages 12 to 18 whose lives have been affected by someone else’s drinking. “Our partnerships with community organizations continues to grow.”

Lane said latest partnerships include Wilson County Department of Social Services with its financial support through its Eat Smart Move More grant that allowed the center to increase its “Stretching and Scripture” class from once a week to twice a week. She said RC3 also received a grant from the Wilson County ABC Board that allows them to continue the “Easy Does It Café,” which is every Monday night.

“This is a time where those in recovery, family and friends in the community at large can come together and enjoy live music in a safe, sober environment,” Lane said. “Our numbers for this event have tripled over the past 12 months.”

Hill said Lane along with Meredith Collins, RC3’s administrative staff member, are vital to the center’s continued success.

“Gina and Meredith have worked tirelessly to build a center that has become a calming refuge for those in need, a place of learning for those who wish to grow, and a shining example of how a community can come together to support recovery,” Hill added.

CELEBRATING RECOVERY

September is National Recovery Month and is billed as a time to reflect, celebrate and unite in knowing there is hope beyond substance use disorders.

“Recovery month is a time for us, as a community, to gather around and celebrate those who are in recovery, as well as create a greater awareness of what recovery really means,” Hill said. “It’s a chance for us to share our stories, our triumphs over the disease of addiction, helping to reinforce the fact that, ‘we do recover.’”

Hill said they are excited about the second annual Live Life in Color 5K and 1-mile fun run to be held on Saturday, Sept. 28, at 8 a.m. at the Greater Wilson Rotary Park. The event supports substance use prevention and recovery support efforts in Wilson County.

“It’s important that we have as many community members and organizations present at our run to show how Wilson County really is one of the best when it comes to supporting those in recovery and those battling with addiction,” Hill said. “I think we’re one of the best recovery communities in the state, and this event is a chance to show it.”

Hill said Recovery Month is about friends, families, business leaders, government officials and everyone in between embracing those who have battled addition.

“In Wilson, specifically, it’s about us rallying around those who call our recovery community their home,” he said. “It’s important to show everyone that recovery is something to be celebrated.”

The event is open to all including pets and strollers, families, groups and individual runners. Registration for the 5K is $30. One-mile registration is $10. For more information or to sign up, contact RC3, located at 2860 Ward Blvd., Suite C, at 252-991-7267.

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